How Sprinting Automatically Forces 
Improved Flexibility
While many fitness trends come and go over the decades...

One school of that that has never been argued or questioned...

Is the importance of maintaining flexibility...

Not only for sports, but for pretty much all aspects of life...

Including especially...our long term health and mobility as we get older.  

This Biggest Obstacle 
to Maintaining Flexibility

Despite the consensus on the universal importance of flexibility...

It’s still extremely easy to ignore…

Because in most people’s daily lives, even those of us who workout regularly...

The immediate benefits of good flexibility are not at all apparent.

Nor are the costs of poor flexibility. In other words, it's very easy to get by without it.  

The problem is, without a conscious effort to at least maintain what you currently have...

Your flexibility will continue to get worse, year by year...

Until one day you look in the mirror, and realize you move around, well…like an old person.  

And for many people, that day comes suddenly...

When their lack of flexibility finally results in a crippling injury that they never quite come back from.  

How Sprinting Creates An Immediate Need

The great part about sprint training is…from day 1, the benefits of flexibility become insanely obvious.  

If you aren't flexible enough, you can't run fast, plain and simple.  

And you look stupid and weak, compared to those who actually are flexible and as a result, run way faster than you. 

And once the motivation becomes painfully obvious...

Flexibility becomes a goal you simply can't ignore, and won't want to.  

Up next...

The 2 Chains of Flexibility

As you start learning more about the mechanics of the human body in regards to sprinting specifically...

What you'll quickly see is that rather than focusing on the flexibility of each muscle individually...

It's far more effective to focus on a chain of muscles that work together to accomplish one goal.  

And the two chains to know are:

1. The ANTERIOR chain - which runs on the front half of body...

From the chest, down to the abs, hip flexors, and quads. 

2. The POSTERIOR chain - which runs on the back half of the body...

From mid back, to the lower back, the glutes, hamstrings, and finally the calf.  

It is these two chains specifically, that ultimately determine your range of motion with each stride...

And therefore has an enormous impact on running speed.